Campfire at minus 20c

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Sometimes you need to get out of the house. A campfire in winter is a good idea. The dry conditions make wood burn easily.

Inuvik has campfire pits by the river, where it is legal to hold a small fire like this.

Christmas concert at the Igloo Church

_DSC0261_1024x768 _DSC0266_1024x768 _DSC0273_1024x768 _DSC0276_1024x768 _DSC0278_1024x768 _DSC0281_1024x768Every year Inuvik’s largest church hosts a Christmas concert. This year’s event featured four lanuages: English, Gwich’in, Inuvialuktun and also the Filipino Choir.

Many proud parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, brothers, sisters, classmates, neighbours, co-workers, here. This type of event really makes a person feel like a welcome member of a community.

Watchful raven


I really wonder about the daily life of ravens. How do they survive in the -30 temperatures? How do their stomachs process frozen food, and their feet withstand perching on ice?

Amazing birds.

Full moon over the “moon base”



moon116A very bright full moon was visible this week. Here it is shown illuminating the New North Networks dome building which is a store, adapted from an old “dewline” radar system. The place looks like something in science-fiction.

Winter has truly arrived: 60km winds

Inuvik saw wind gusting to 60kilometres an hour on Monday. It was enough to send snow drifts on the streets and rattle street signs.

Australian Santa visits Inuvik

It’s below freezing outside but people have fun. Here’s lifeguard Santa at the community pool. Surf’s up.

Blogroll: Check out this excellent blog from Yellowknife

I’d like to point out Tandi Wilkinson’s blog from the NWT’s capital of Yellowknife.

In many ways people in “old town” and houseboats live more closely to the land than people in Inuvik. Things like crossing lake ice are not part of daily life for most people here.

Worth a look for sure.